Mobile Mammography Unit to Make Regular Visits to Oconto Falls

The city of Oconto Falls and its surrounding communities will soon have greater access to breast health screenings thanks to mobile mammography that will be offered on the campus of HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital.

Starting Friday, April 2, a mobile mammography unit will travel to the HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital Prevea Oconto Falls Health Center located at 835 S. Main St. in Oconto Falls. It will return to this location on the 1st, 3rd and 4th Fridays of each month and the 2nd Monday of each month. Appointments will be available between 8:40 a.m. and 2:40 p.m.

The unit, fully accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR), is equipped with mammography technology that has the capability to provide 3-D and/or digital images. It also features two changing rooms and a waiting room and is staffed by a registered mammography technologist.

Prevea Health, HSHS St. Vincent Hospital, HSHS St. Mary’s Hospital Medical Center, HSHS St. Nicholas Hospital and HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital launched the mobile mammography unit in 2018 to provide residents in rural areas greater access to high-quality breast health screenings. The unit also currently travels to:

  • HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital Prevea Gillett Health Center
  • HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital Prevea Lena Health Center
  • HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital Prevea Mountain Health Center
  • Prevea Marinette Health Center
  • Prevea Oconto Health Center
  • Prevea Pulaski Health Center
  • Prevea Seymour Health Center
  • Prevea Shawano Health Center
  • Prevea Kewaunee Health Center
  • Prevea Manitowoc Health Center
  • Prevea Plymouth Health Center
  • Prevea Luxemburg Health Center

Appointments in any of the above-mentioned communities, including in Oconto Falls, can be made now by calling (920) 496-4789. To learn more about the mobile mammography unit, and to watch a video tour of the unit, visit: www.prevea.com/mammo

All women should talk with their health care provider about the appropriate timing for screening mammograms, especially women who are age 40 or at high-risk. A schedule will be based upon an individual’s health. At age 40, any woman may wish to begin regular screening mammograms. By age 45, women should have a screening mammogram and continue to have one at least every other year.

Domain Name Scams: How to Recognize & Avoid Them

No one likes to be fooled by scammers or questionable ads. Domain name notification letters and emails are a good example. A typical subject line goes something like this: “This is your final notice for domain listing.” Although disguised as legitimate requests for domain name renewal or transfer, these notifications are rarely legitimate. In this article, I explain domain names, how to recognize domain name scams, and how to avoid these scams.

A domain name is referred to as an Internet deed to online real estate. The domain name is the group of letters that “point” users to a website. For example, our company’s domain name is PackerlandWebsites.com. Every website owner needs a domain name and needs to renew the name at least annually. On a side note, Packerland Websites helps clients choose and secure domain names that work best for them.

Next, here are some telltale signs of a domain name scams.

  • Errors in emails – Scammers, especially those operating outside the U.S., often send emails with spelling and grammatical mistakes.
  • Emails without account numbers – A legitimate domain name expiration notice will include a domain name registry account number.
  • Emails from unusual senders – The sender’s address can be a tip-off, although even reputable domain registrars like GoDaddy get spoofed by cybercriminals.
  • Emails with peculiar links – For example, Packerland Websites received a domain name renewal email with a link to a hair salon, not a reputable domain name registrar. That made us suspicious. Never click on a link you don’t recognize and trust.

So, how does a company or nonprofit guard against these scams? Essentially, domain name scams rely on people being unfamiliar with their domain name registration. Therefore, knowledge is power. The best way to protect yourself is to answer two questions: Where is my domain name registered? When does my domain name expire?

If you don’t know the answer to these questions, visit the website whois.net and type in your domain name. You will find the registrar and expiration date.

Although domain name emails and letters may contain technical terms that look official, don’t be fooled. For more information about domain names or other items related to websites, contact your website developer or Packerland Websites, 920-826-5901 or Team@PackerlandWebsites.com.

By Bill Koehne, Packerland Websites

Prevea Community COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic at HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital in Oconto Falls

The Prevea Community COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic at HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital in Oconto Falls is providing COVID-19 vaccinations to all community members eligible for the vaccine under the vaccination prioritization guidelines set by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS).

Currently, frontline health care personnel, residents in skilled nursing and long-term care facilities, police and fire personnel and adults ages 65 and older are eligible for vaccination at the Prevea Community COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic at HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital, 855 S. Main St., Oconto Falls.

Appointments are required and appointment availability is dependent on available vaccine supply that is provided by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. Community members should not present to the hospital for vaccination without an appointment.

How to make an appointment
The fastest way to get an appointment scheduled for COVID-19 vaccination through Prevea Health is with MyPrevea. Visit www.myprevea.com to set up an account at no cost. You do not have to be a Prevea patient to sign up for a MyPrevea account. MyPrevea is also available as an app on any smartphone or other device.

If you do not have access or are unable to use the internet, we have a toll-free number dedicated to COVID-19 vaccination questions and information: 1 (833) 344 – 4373. (Please do not call the hospital directly to schedule an appointment.)

Having trouble, or still have questions?
Visit www.prevea.com/vaccine for information on Prevea Community COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic locations, how to create a MyPrevea account, how to schedule a COVID-19 vaccination and more.
For the latest on who is eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in Wisconsin, Prevea Health encourages everyone to regularly check the DHS website at: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-about.htm

Winter weather reminder: Stay safe, don’t delay emergency care

Winter is here, and snow has already covered much of Northeast Wisconsin. With more winter weather on the way, HSHS St. Vincent, St. Mary’s, St. Nicholas and St. Clare Memorial Hospitals want to remind community members about some important safety tips to keep in mind.

“We see a variety of injuries and illnesses as a result from severe winter weather each year, including those from motor vehicle accidents on icy roads, over-exertion from snow shoveling, injuries from misuse of snowblowers, slips, falls and more,” said Dr. Angela Wright, emergency medicine physician at HSHS St. Vincent Hospital and HSHS St. Mary’s Hospital Medical Center in Green Bay. “We encourage everyone to be safe as more winter weather approaches, but also want everyone to know that our HSHS emergency departments and medical providers are ready to care for you, 24/7, should you need us. Never delay emergency care – even amid a pandemic.”

Tips to prevent slips and falls:

  • Beware of wet, dark areas on the pavement. There may be thin, hardly visible layers of ice (black ice) on these spots as a result of dew or water vapor freezing. It is best to treat all pavement as slippery in cold temperatures.
  • Walk slowly and take short strides. Use handrails when walking up or down steps. Choose well-walked paths and avoid taking shortcuts, since these areas may not be accessible for snow or ice removal.
  • Keep your hands free and extend your arms while walking. Avoid carrying too much or placing your hands in your pockets. This will keep your center of gravity from decreasing and help to maintain balance.

Tips for safe snow shoveling:

  • Know if you shouldn’t shovel. Certain people should avoid shoveling snow. If you have a history of heart problems, you should avoid this activity. Click here for more information about the link between cold weather and heart attacks.
  • Dress appropriately. Wear light clothing in layers to provide both ventilation and insulation. To keep warm, wear a hat, gloves and thick socks. Avoid falls by wearing shoes or boots with slip-resistant soles.
  • Warm up first. Before you begin shoveling the snow, warm up your muscles for approximately 10 minutes by doing stretches or other light exercises.
  • Use proper equipment. Use a shovel that is comfortable for your height and strength. Do not use a shovel that is too heavy or too long for you. Space your hands on the tool grip to increase your leverage.
  • Lift snow correctly. Try to push the snow instead of lifting it. If you must lift, do it properly. Squat with your legs apart, knees bent and back straight. Lift with your legs. Avoid bending at the waist. Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it. Holding a shovelful of snow with your arms outstretched puts too much weight on your spine. Never remove deep snow all at once. Do it in pieces.
  • Avoid overexerting yourself. Be very careful not to overexert yourself as you work. Pace yourself and take breaks often. It’s a good idea to go indoors to warm up. Taking five to 10 minutes to relax gives your body time to rest. Pay attention to the signals your body is sending. If you feel pain or pressure in your chest, call 911.

HSHS emergency departments in Eastern Wisconsin:
HSHS St. Vincent Hospital – 835 S. Van Buren St., Green Bay
HSHS St. Mary’s Hospital Medical Center – 1726 Shawano Ave., Green Bay
HSHS St. Nicholas Hospital – 3100 Superior Ave., Sheboygan
HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital – 855 S. Main St., Oconto Falls

National Suicide Prevention Week is Sept. 6-12

Close to 800,000 people die due to suicide every year, which is one person every 40 seconds, according to the World Health Organization.

Navigating a pandemic and national unrest may contribute to this troubling statistic, as fear and anxiety may overcome us as we’re trying to understand what’s happening around us.

As National Suicide Prevention Week (Sept. 6 – 12) approaches, HSHS St. Vincent, St. Mary’s, St. Nicholas and St. Clare Memorial hospitals remind everyone that if you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts, you should call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or dial 911.

Alyssa Van Duyse, an HSHS colleague and suicide prevention instructor certified by the national QPR Institute, says it’s important to not only take note of your own feelings during this uncertain time, but also of those around you.

“The word ‘suicide’ is still thought of as taboo – especially in the Midwest because we’re not so great at talking about our feelings,” says Alyssa. “That’s why it’s important to recognize the clues a person may be contemplating suicide.”

Four ways someone may tell you they are contemplating suicide:

  1. They give a direct verbal clue by saying something like “I’m going to end it all,” or “I wish I were dead.”
  2. They give a coded verbal clue by saying something like “I”m tired of life. I just want out,” or “I can’t take it anymore.”
  3. They exhibit behavioral clues like increased risk-taking, self-injurious behavior or drug or alcohol abuse.
  4. They should situational clues like being fired from a job, being diagnosed with a serious illness or being bullied or humiliated.

During QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) suicide prevention classes, Alyssa instructs participants to practice asking the question, “Are you thinking about suicide?”

“If you practice it, it won’t be so hard to ask if you ever have to ask someone in a real-life situation,” she says. “Also, sometimes people who are considering suicide are relieved if you ask because it indicates that someone noticed their struggle.”

For more information about how you can help someone struggling with mental health, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Helping Children Become More Comfortable With Wearing a Mask

Wearing a cloth mask, in addition to practicing physical distancing and frequent handwashing, plays a critical role in curbing the spread of COVID-19 in our communities.

HSHS St. Vincent Children’s Hospital and Prevea Health offer the following guidance for parents and caregivers in helping children become more comfortable with wearing a mask.

Should all children wear a mask?

Children under the age of 2 should not wear a mask due to suffocation and choking hazards. In addition, parents of children with cognitive or respiratory impairments should exercise caution with masks for their children. If you have any questions or concerns about whether your child is healthy enough to wear a mask, it is important you consult with their primary care physician.

How can I help my child become more comfortable and/or less afraid of wearing a mask?

One of the most effective ways to help your child become more comfortable with wearing a mask is by being a role model. When you also wear a mask, and do so with a positive attitude, your child is likely to follow your lead! Here are some more helpful tips to help your children become more comfortable with masks:

  • Look in the mirror with your child while you each wear a mask, and talk about it.
  • Put a mask on a favorite stuffed animal.
  • Decorate the child’s mask(s) so they’re more personalized and fun.
  • Show your child pictures of other children wearing masks.
  • Draw a mask on their favorite book character.
  • Practice wearing the mask at home to help your child get used to it.

How can I talk to my child about wearing a mask?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that for children under the age of 3, it’s best to answer their questions simply in language they understand. If they ask about why people are wearing masks, explain that sometimes people wear them when they are sick, and when they are all better, they stop wearing them.

For children over the age of 3, the AAP recommends you focus on germs. Explain that germs are special to your own body. Some germs are good and some are bad. The bad ones can make you sick. Since we can’t always tell which are good or bad, the masks help make sure you keep those germs away from your own body.

Additional resources:

Dr. Josh Rankin, pediatrician at Prevea Health, recently shared these tips and much more on our most recent episode of Plug in to Health, Kids and Masking. Plug in to Health is a podcast produced by Prevea Health and available on major podcasting platforms such as Apple and Google Play, and at: www.prevea.com/podcast

Prevea Health has more resources dedicated to helping adults and children navigate mask-wearing, including: How masks work, how to clean cloth masks, avoiding fogging glasses and skin irritation, and debunking mask myths. All of these resources are available in one convenient location at: www.prevea.com/masking

Understanding Universal Masking

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Surgeon General recommend the practice of universal masking when in public and interacting with others. Universal masking, in addition to the practices
of physical distancing and proper hygiene, helps to curb the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

HSHS St. Vincent, St. Mary’s, St. Nicholas and St. Clare Memorial Hospitals, in partnership with Prevea Health, offer the
following answers to some of the most frequently-asked-questions about universal masking.

What does “universal masking” mean?
It means that everyone (if able) should wear a mask. There are some exceptions, including children under the age of two, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

What type of mask should I wear?
Medical-grade masks, such as surgical masks or N95s, should be reserved for medical personnel only during this critical time. Therefore, the CDC recommends cloth masks for community members. There are tutorials for making masks with and without a sewing a machine, here. Some tutorials call for the use of common items, such as t-shirts and bandanas, with no sewing required.

When should I wear a cloth mask?
You should wear your cloth mask if you must leave your home for any public setting such as a grocery store, gas station, pharmacy or other essential business. You should also wear it if you are interacting with anyone outside your home for any reason.

Will wearing a cloth mask prevent me from contracting COVID-19?
Wearing a cloth mask is not guaranteed to prevent you from contracting COVID-19, and it is important physical distancing (stay at least 6 feet from others) is still practiced while wearing one.

If wearing a cloth mask will not guarantee me full protection from COVID-19, then why is it important I wear one?
Studies show a significant portion of individuals infected with COVID-19 do not show symptoms, and that even those who eventually develop symptoms can transmit the virus before showing symptoms. Wearing a cloth mask can help to keep your respiratory secretions (where the virus can live) contained and prevent them from spreading to others. A mask can also prevent you from touching your nose and mouth, where the virus can easily be spread.

Should cloth masks be washed or cleaned?
Yes. They should be routinely washed in a washing machine, or with soap and water, depending on frequency of use.

How does one safely remove a used cloth mask?
Individuals should be careful not to touch their eyes, nose and mouth when removing their mask, and wash hands immediately after removing.

A new episode of Prevea Health’s podcast, Plug in to Health, is dedicated to helping listeners better understand
universal masking. COVID-19: Understanding Universal Masking is available now on Plug in to Health, which can be
accessed on all major podcasting platforms, including Apple and Spotify, as well as at: www.prevea.com/podcast.

Update Regarding HSHS Hospital Visitor Restrictions

In an effort to further control the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) into our hospitals as well as throughout the community, Hospital Sisters Health System (HSHS) is implementing updated visitor restrictions at the following hospitals, effective 7 a.m. on March 21, 2020:

  • HSHS St. Vincent Hospital, Green Bay
  • HSHS St. Vincent Children’s Hospital, Green Bay
  • HSHS St. Mary’s Hospital Medical Center, Green Bay
  • HSHS St. Nicholas Hospital, Sheboygan
  • HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital, Oconto Falls
  • Libertas Treatment Center, Green Bay and Marinette

Visitors are not allowed at any of the above-mentioned locations until further notice. The new and only exception to this policy allows for ONE (1) approved adult visitor, who is cold/flu symptom-free, for the duration of a patient’s stay under the following circumstances:

  • Obstetrical patients may have ONE (1) support person.
  • Pediatric patients under the age of 18 may have ONE (1) parent or guardian present.
  • Patients nearing end-of-life may have ONE (1) support person; extenuating circumstances will be evaluated.
  • Outpatient services patients should ask their support person to wait in the car until their service is complete.
  • Patients having surgery may have ONE (1) support person.
  • Patients seeking emergency care may have ONE (1) support person who is required to be in the patient room at all times; extenuating circumstances will be evaluated.

It is imperative to make these changes for the safety of all patients and hospital staff to reduce the risk of infection and to preserve important health care resources during this time of a public health emergency. We understand how important it is for loved ones to be able to connect to patients during times of need, and so we encourage the use of cell phone calls, text or video chat if available. Loved ones can also call our hospitals directly to be connected to patients’ rooms via telephone.

  • HSHS St. Vincent: (920) 433-0111
  • HSHS St. Mary’s: (920) 498-4200
  • HSHS St. Nicholas: (920) 459-8300
  • HSHS St. Clare Memorial : (920) 846-3444

Abrams Theater to hold auditions for Mark Twain Show

Abrams Spotlight Productions Inc. will hold virtual auditions for its summer play, “Mark Twain’s the Diaries of Adam and Eve.” Adults and teens 16 and older are encouraged to audition. The play calls for a variety of roles, both male and female. Newcomers are encouraged to audition. No previous experience is necessary.

The play is a light-hearted look at the world’s first love story through the eyes of America’s great humorist, Mark Twain. Throughout the play, the Garden of Eden bursts with wit, laughter, and the lyric poignance of the first love and the first loss.

The show is scheduled to be presented June 19-21 and 26-28 at the Nancy Byng Community Theater, 5852 Maple St., Abrams.

Anyone interested in auditioning should email theater.aspi@gmail.com or call 920-826-5852. Individuals will be asked to record themselves reading from the script and send the recording to ASPI electronically. ASPI will provide the reading. Submissions are due by 8 p.m. Friday, March 27.

Anyone interested in helping out behind the scenes should call 920-826-5852 to volunteer.

First produced for “American Playhouse,” on PBS, “Mark Twain’s the Diaries of Adam and Eve” is a uniquely American theater piece. The show has been produced well over 200 times in both extended runs and touring engagements at regional theaters, university theaters, and performing arts centers across the country.

OFHS Choir Students Selected to WCDA All-State Choir

L to R: Connor Romandine, Autumn Canavera, Isabella Rennie, Cedar Olson, and Keith Van Dornick

Oconto Falls High School Choirs were proud to have five students selected to perform as part of the WCDA All-State Choirs in January, 2020. Approximately 100 -120 singers from the state were selected for each of the choirs, which represented outstanding choral students from throughout the state. A final All-State Choir performance was held at Lawrence University in Appleton.

Representing the All-State Bass Clef Choir were Connor Romandine, son on Ron and Carrie Romandine, and Keith Van Dornick, son of Wendy and James Van Dornick, Jr. Autumn Canavera, daughter of Scott and Jennifer Canavera, Cedar Olson, daughter of Scott Olson, and Isabella Rennie, daughter of Chad and Heather Rennie, were selected for the All-State Treble Clef Choir. Students were nominated by their high school choral director, Miss Amy Thiel.

The conductor of the All-State Bass Clef Choir was Dr. Anthony Trecek-King, President and Artistic Director of the award-winning Boston Children’s Choir. The 108-voice men’s ensemble representing 38 high schools choral music programs in Wisconsin performed Ho Boys Cancha Lin’em, Song of the Blacksmith, Arrow, The Warrior, Sit Down Servant, and Hard Times Comes Again No More.

The conductor of the All-State Treble Clef Choir was Professor Giselle Wyers of the University of Washington, where she conducts the University Chorale. The 119-voice women’s ensemble representing 46 high school choral music programs in Wisconsin performed Vidi Aquam, Flower Duet, In Freezing Winter Night, Nada te Turbe, Woodsmoke and Oranges, and Barso.

The All-State Choir program is one of four signature programs offered by the Wisconsin Choral Directors Association that promotes its mission to foster musical excellence through education, collaboration, and inspiration.